Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Tessa Gray
    Misconceptions about MLEs
    23 August
    Public discussion Created by Tessa Gray

    Just stumbled across a conversation in the Facebook NZ Primary teachers facebook page. It was sparked by a teacher viewing a one-page advertisement in magazine from a school who had one catch phrase, 'Open plan, modern learning environments don't work.' In the rest of the thread was a link to a Stuff.co.nz article, Teachers struggle with Modern Learning Environments where one teachers account shows,

    "Endless collaboration between teachers sharing the spaces has distracted them from teaching pupils, who are in turn distracted by each other. Learning outcomes have gone down, not up, but no one wants to discuss the elephant in the room, he says." www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/90983510/teachers-struggle-with-modern-learning-environments​

    ClassroomIt was also interesting to watch the ping pong comments sway between comments that MLEs are nothing new and open-plan classrooms have been around since the 80's (without new gadgets) and didn't work then and aren't working now - to comments that say collaborative teaching in an MLE is only as good as the teaching, and;

    If you collaborate, share, respond to individual student needs proactively with your colleagues, and focus on improving student outcomes through building key relationships, then of course it can work. But teachers need to be trained, receptive and supported to implement new ways of doing things. And they have to be people who connect and work well together.

    No doubt this great debate happens all over the country in and out of staffrooms. Is there some substance to concerns? Is there research to either confirm or deny the impact of modern or innovative learning pedagogies? What are the bigger issues here and what supports your argument?

    Image source: classroom

    Kia ora Duncan

    I have enjoyed your posts, questions and reflections. You might enjoy this article  "How People Learn: An Education Revolution Two Decades Delayed" ... It refers to research from 1999 that 'explained the way our understanding of learning changed in the 20th century' It has some clear explanations about terms such as student centred learning, exactly what it means and why it underpins the more recent pedagogical approaches that underpin ILE's etc. Like you it brings the discussion right back to what's important - how we learn and how we support learning and the 'learner as a whole' rather than the buildings we teach in. The research found three key factors in how we learn (see below) . The article/research may be useful in conversations when you are supporting others to focus on teacher practice. 

    • Learners’ preconceptions are the starting place for their further learning
    • Deep foundations of knowledge for deeper learning
    • A metacognitive approach to teaching and learning

    Also Grow Waitaha is constantly exploring the communication challenges schools exploring new models often face - so you may wish to explore resources available through that website.

    - By Helen Cooper
      • Helen Cooper
        By Helen Cooper
        Jun 18

        Kia ora Duncan

        I have enjoyed your posts, questions and reflections. You might enjoy this article  "How People Learn: An Education Revolution Two Decades Delayed" ... It refers to research from 1999 that 'explained the way our understanding of learning changed in the 20th century' It has some clear explanations about terms such as student centred learning, exactly what it means and why it underpins the more recent pedagogical approaches that underpin ILE's etc. Like you it brings the discussion right back to what's important - how we learn and how we support learning and the 'learner as a whole' rather than the buildings we teach in. The research found three key factors in how we learn (see below) . The article/research may be useful in conversations when you are supporting others to focus on teacher practice. 

        • Learners’ preconceptions are the starting place for their further learning
        • Deep foundations of knowledge for deeper learning
        • A metacognitive approach to teaching and learning

        Also Grow Waitaha is constantly exploring the communication challenges schools exploring new models often face - so you may wish to explore resources available through that website.

          • Duncan
            By Duncan
            Jun 14

            I think we need to focus on teacher practice as opposed to environments. If teachers are equipped with the mindset and the ability to teach in all environments (the average classroom teacher doesn't get to design the physical environment) they make themselves a more 'employable' teacher as they can mold to what the school needs. Does teacher training reflect the variety of classroom environments out there?

            Some of those opposed to ILEs/MLEs feel there isn't enough evidence related to student achievement. I say student achievement is not the only purpose of a school. They need to consider the hauora, the soft skills that employers want, alongside student achievement.  

             

             

            • Tessa Gray
              By Tessa Gray
              May 11

              And the debate continues @ ILEs and MLEs | The hot debate continues. What do you think?

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