Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Tessa Gray
    A little can be huge when colouring in white spaces
    24 October
    Public discussion Created by Tessa Gray

    As most of you know, Ann Milne: Colouring in the white spaces was the final keynote for uLearn17. Jedd Bartlett also shared the keynote presentation from EDtalks.

    Here's a recent blog post (23 Oct 17) from Dr Ann Milne, Who should learn most about White Privilege—Māori children or Pākehā children? with some more interesting statistics and provocations from Dr Ann Milne about white privilege – also something urgent for Pākehā teachers (and parents) to be challenged by.

    I try and tell my children they’re privileged, not to be ‘better than most’ but to acknowledge that there are things they shouldn't ever take for granted - like the very things granted to them because they are growing up Pākehā. I also share how privileged we are to have our first peoples culture, that brings so much meaning and wairua to Aotearoa, something we nearly lost and could still lose in these white spaces. Our kids learn from us and watch everything we do. The same must be said for us as teachers too.

    Alex Hotere Barnes recently challenged us to question our implicit bias and reading Maurie Abraham’s blog post, Challenge of Biculturalism Lies With Pakeha earlier this year also challenged me to be more conscious of how I make Māori feel in my presence. Where Māori have always made me feel welcome, respected, enjoyed, I want to know I’ve done the same – where my cultural status/privilege hasn’t whitened/dominated another person’s culture, identity and potential. Like this Spark ad, a little can be huge. What’s the one little thing that could be huge when colouring in the white spaces?

    I've found this EDTalks from @alexhoterebarnes really helpful when considering actions or steps to take towards supporting Māori to succeed how they want to succeed in our mahi.

    Alex Hotere-Barnes - Addressing Pākehā paralysis with non-stupid optimism from EDtalks on Vimeo.

    Alex talks about having a knowledge of your own cultural identity first, understanding and knowing some levels of te reo and tikanga Maorī and knowing who will benefit from those, being part of the process to help rejuvenate te reo Māori – an important element is to ensure that pronunciation is correct, so practice often to improve your pronunciation and establishing and nurturing long-term relationships (over the long term) to support educational change, so that Māori are not harmed from our educational system.

    Alex also talks about the importance of overcoming or working through Pākehā paralysis, so that our educational systems is more  inclusive and socially just. What is your take-a-way from this short video?

    - By Tessa Gray
      • Tessa Gray
        By Tessa Gray
        Nov 6

        I've found this EDTalks from Alex Hotere-Barnes really helpful when considering actions or steps to take towards supporting Māori to succeed how they want to succeed in our mahi.

        Alex Hotere-Barnes - Addressing Pākehā paralysis with non-stupid optimism from EDtalks on Vimeo.

        Alex talks about having a knowledge of your own cultural identity first, understanding and knowing some levels of te reo and tikanga Maorī and knowing who will benefit from those, being part of the process to help rejuvenate te reo Māori – an important element is to ensure that pronunciation is correct, so practice often to improve your pronunciation and establishing and nurturing long-term relationships (over the long term) to support educational change, so that Māori are not harmed from our educational system.

        Alex also talks about the importance of overcoming or working through Pākehā paralysis, so that our educational systems is more  inclusive and socially just. What is your take-a-way from this short video?

        • Tessa Gray
          By Tessa Gray
          Oct 24

          Thanks for sharing Kerri’s post Viv Hall, I can see how Kerri has been inspired as an educator and mother of Māori tamariki. I also agree it starts with us and our personal stories. The challenge comes to push beyond – to be informed, to not replicate the status quo and maybe be brave and become ‘disruptors’ like Ann calls herself.

          If schools have a responsibility to sustain and revitalise culture instead of perpetuating the white hegemony of power do our Māori students see themselves in their education? Do they have critical, authentic hope…? As Ann shares, once our Māori children know who they are, they are culturally strong and academically strong. Are there some deliberate actions we can identify to remove the barriers for those not in the dominant culture? Little to huge…what do these look like?

          ​The challenge to me - is to get off the fence…I’m not in the classroom, so in the context of professional learning talk I can ask, do our conversations have Māori as Māori at the heart, or is Māori marginalized, do we reinforce the deficit and perpetuate the status quo? Can I move this focus to the top of my mahi - make this urgent, a priority; where I work hard to help redefine the success for Māori - beyond my own western understandings/ systems? Is this too important to remain on the fence? Fence

          • Viv Hall
            By Viv Hall
            Oct 24

            Anne Milne's keynote at Ulearn has been buzzing around in my head ever since, I arrived back in Tāmaki Makaurau.  I am slowly working on making meaning for me, sounds selfish but as Anne points out we need to have a firm understanding of our own identity first.  I reflect on my own experience as a Std 1 child making a paper mache Pa site, not making any connection to my buddies I played with at school.    My 'learning' seemed to connect that with General Custer and the "cowboys and Indians" on the TV!  While shaking my head, I also remember this whakatauki " Ka mua, ka muri: looking back in order to move foward" this is part of my journey. 

            Kerri Thompson has written a very thoughtful, reflective blog "The white spaces are even in my head"

            "As a pakeha educator I was challenged to consider how our education system is full of white spaces; we have been challenged to interrogate these white spaces." 

            How are you going to respond to Kerri's challenge?

             

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