Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    edSpace
    The advantages of equity for disadvantaged students
    5 December
    Public discussion Created by edSpace

    Here's some more gold from OECD community. Issues like equity and disparity in education are a global phenomena.

    Education can be an engine of social inclusion. It can also help reduce broader social inequality. This can be the case if and only if all students, regardless of disadvantages, are given the same opportunity to succeed. What challenges do teachers face when teaching students from socio-economically disadvantaged homes? How can schools better support teachers in their efforts to provide equity?
     

    Click the link to learn more about equity for all students. How does this relate to conditions for teaching and learning in Aotearoa? Please also share your experiences in this area by clicking Reply!

    The advantages of equity for disadvantaged students_OECD

    Kia ora, Justin I know you're committed to 'leveling the playing field' for your students as per your interview earlier this year, and a great read here for schools, in A tiriti leap of courage, thank you Alex.

    Balance

    The OECD article had less of a technology slant and more findings akin to the findings from Russell Bishop's work, but a challenge that caught my eye is, Disparities in student results do reflect differences in the level of educational resources disadvantaged groups receive. 

    I've become more interested in a safe and healthy and equitable 'balance' of using technologies as well. Technologies can certainly open windows and doors for our students, if they have equitable access to resources and your points Alex about a) identifying diverse cultural experiences and worldviews and b) enabling Māori and non-Māori to see themselves in their their digital world are also important.

    Devil's advocate >>>

    Does it seem fair to offer home/school connections via online platforms, if there is limited/no access to the Internet at homeIs there any point advocating the 'Bring your own device' if whānau and guardians can't afford it (or the upkeep)? Should we encourage multiple modes for processing/presenting, if it doesn't affirm and expand the language, identities and culture of students through digital technologies?

    Great to see the digital Māori initiatives you've mentioned Alex and some wonderful ideas from Ginette Van Praag in this Enabling e-Learning post, Food for thought...or maybe not? for some strategies schools can try to mitigate the digital divide.

    Also see, The digital divide: what is our moral imperative? 

    Love to hear what other people think too smiley

    - By Tessa Gray
      • Tessa Gray
        By Tessa Gray
        Dec 18

        Kia ora, Justin I know you're committed to 'leveling the playing field' for your students as per your interview earlier this year, and a great read here for schools, in A tiriti leap of courage, thank you Alex.

        Balance

        The OECD article had less of a technology slant and more findings akin to the findings from Russell Bishop's work, but a challenge that caught my eye is, Disparities in student results do reflect differences in the level of educational resources disadvantaged groups receive. 

        I've become more interested in a safe and healthy and equitable 'balance' of using technologies as well. Technologies can certainly open windows and doors for our students, if they have equitable access to resources and your points Alex about a) identifying diverse cultural experiences and worldviews and b) enabling Māori and non-Māori to see themselves in their their digital world are also important.

        Devil's advocate >>>

        Does it seem fair to offer home/school connections via online platforms, if there is limited/no access to the Internet at homeIs there any point advocating the 'Bring your own device' if whānau and guardians can't afford it (or the upkeep)? Should we encourage multiple modes for processing/presenting, if it doesn't affirm and expand the language, identities and culture of students through digital technologies?

        Great to see the digital Māori initiatives you've mentioned Alex and some wonderful ideas from Ginette Van Praag in this Enabling e-Learning post, Food for thought...or maybe not? for some strategies schools can try to mitigate the digital divide.

        Also see, The digital divide: what is our moral imperative? 

        Love to hear what other people think too smiley

        • Alex Hotere-Barnes
          By Alex Hotere-Barnes
          Dec 5

          Kia ora koutou - I'm looking forward to reading this report in more depth. Thank you!

          In the meantime, I've been thinking for some time about how Te Tiriti o Waitangi can be used as a medium for inclusion for all young people and communities. Recently I used digital tech as an example of how te Tiriti can be used in this medium to provide us with opportunities and challenges about inclusion in Aotearoa.

          I like your question Justin! I'd like to assume we're involved in the education game because we're committed to creating a fair and just society, economy and revitalised natural world.

          • Justin Hickey
            By Justin Hickey
            Dec 5

            Fantastic discussion. I see this on a daily basis. I also see how different teachers interact with socio-economically disadvantaged students. This is a massive factor that underpins the broader issue of student wellbeing. I look forward to seeing where this discussion goes. Personally, I think we all need to ask ourselves the question, "what do we do to ensure we are nurturing an supporting student wellbeing for socio-economically disadvantaged students"?

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