Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Viv Hall
    What ducky are you going to put down?
    27 February
    Public discussion Created by Viv Hall

    Put down the ducky. Helen Timperley of the University of Auckland makes the strategic point that when we are learning something new, we have to decide what we are going to stop doing. She illustrates this with a clip from Sesame Street.

    As a facilitator, In this relatively new environment offering professional learning, I've noticed an increase in teachers discussing the pressure they are feeling when embarking on professional learning. Often they push it to the side, leaving their needs as a learner last. Wellbeing has been highligted by studies as vital for our professional health. As I was building resources for a new course this afternoon I reacquainted myself with the Spirals Playbook and found this little gem. I'd like to start a discussion: So what ducky are you going to put down?

     

    Kai pai Christina

    I'm loving the analogy of the duck and its' connections.  Continuing that on with my facilitators' hat on, reassuring our teacher clinging onto the duck, that putting it down to develop some 'new' foundational skills and mindsets in the knowledge that they can pick it up again.  If they want to .....   I have found in the past the TPACK approach when working on Digital Fluency is very useful. 

    Once they understand that they are already 'experts' in their field, the pedagogy of teaching and also their content or subject areas, integrating technology is not such a challenge. Putting the ducky down can be a reassurance to take that leap. Thoughts?

    - By Viv Hall
      • Viv Hall
        By Viv Hall
        Mar 1

        Kai pai Christina

        I'm loving the analogy of the duck and its' connections.  Continuing that on with my facilitators' hat on, reassuring our teacher clinging onto the duck, that putting it down to develop some 'new' foundational skills and mindsets in the knowledge that they can pick it up again.  If they want to .....   I have found in the past the TPACK approach when working on Digital Fluency is very useful. 

        Once they understand that they are already 'experts' in their field, the pedagogy of teaching and also their content or subject areas, integrating technology is not such a challenge. Putting the ducky down can be a reassurance to take that leap. Thoughts?

        • Catherine Johnson
          By Catherine Johnson
          Feb 28

          Agree Hamish. A critical discussion in the quest to enable an authentic and sustainable experience for learners across all sectors.

          I believe the key is effective and timely support for educators to bring foundational skills and mindsets that equip educators to be agile and responsive to system-wide shifts in expectations.  

          Secret I guess in knowing if we should put the ducky down? No, we need to understand how the duck could develop, and how the duck connects with the other ducks, geese, pigeons, and seagulls. To begin to see this, requires professional quality support in the long-term to engage personal, group, local, and community priorities.

           

          • Viv Hall
            By Viv Hall
            Feb 28

            Hamish, there may be pockets of educators not totally aware of the pace of change in technology.  We publish this Ten Top Trends on a yearly basis  https://www.core-ed.org/research-and-innovation/ten-trends/.  As mentioned above the MOE is implementing a new Digital Technology curriculum also.

            I found it interesting to hear in the video that Ernie puts the duckie down but can also pick it up.  I got to wondering about this as we often encourage people to drop something or stop doing it before embracing the new. 

            What would it look like if we did just that?  Is there space for both approaches?  In face of the new Digital Technology | Hungarau Matihiko curriculum perhaps Maria's point about connecting to current learning is the way to approach it?

             

             

            • Nikki
              By Nikki
              Feb 28

              Hamish - that is exactly a question I've been pondering.

              "What can we do to help prepare teachers for significant change?"

              One thing I am exploring is helping teachers and staff become aware of how much change is present in life.  How much significant change we actually have overcome.  There would be far and few people who are in the same house, same job, in the same group of people and have not experienced any change over the last ten years.

              I think when we realise our own successes and celebrate our own strength in overcoming change, we can keep this in mind and believe in ourselves more as we approach the change upon us in education.

              • Kerri
                By Kerri
                Feb 28

                Hey Viv,

                For me it is not so much the ducky I want to put down but more when are others going put down their ducky so educators like myself can get on with future focused pedagogy.

                • Hamish Duff
                  By Hamish Duff
                  Feb 28

                  I think this is a critical discussion - with the pace of technology change increasing, we need to help employees (not just teachers) to rapidly learn new skills and mobilise. In a simplistic sense, isn't this a change management issue? What if I don't want to put down my ducky, but my ducky is no longer relevant to my students?

                  Teachers (employees) are just as resistant to change as anyone else - new ways of working and thinking, and new work habits are a real challenge. As technology changes the role of teachers in the classroom, this is something we need to be preparing for.

                  In general, are educators aware of the scale of technology change on the horizon? From my observations I would say no. 

                  What can we do to help prepare teachers for significant change?

                  • Maria Krausse
                    By Maria Krausse
                    Feb 28

                    Great point. (love the video)

                    Is it putting one thing down to do another or is it connecting to current learning? What can we do to help teachers to integrate new learning and not be overloaded? 

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