Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    CORE Education
    Culture counts in the classroom
    29 May
    Public discussion Created by CORE Education

    In this edTalks, Maria Tibble acknowledges how teachers (with our own backstories), are always thinking about how we can make a difference for our students. One way to make a big difference to Māori students in particular, is to create strong relationships where we get to know their whakapapa, where they come from - their history, stories, deeds of their ancestors embedded in the history and stories of the marae and the land, waterways, mountains, geographical landscape features that anchors them to who they are.

    Culture counts in the classroom

    One way to make a difference would be to open the pathways to invite their culture into the classroom.

    What strategies do you use to create those pathways in your classroom, school or kura? Is this something you do as a big celebration or a little a lot? We'd love to hear, or even see what this looks like at your place. Feel free to add your ideas (photos) or wonderings here smiley.

    Tena koe Tess, the link to ero report : http://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services/   .  

    Also if anyone is interested in joining the kotahitanga bi-culuturalism in ECE discussion page (facebook)  I run the link is here also.  It is a safe space for Kaiako to pose questions and share ideas about bi-cultural practice .  It is a closed page so you need to request to join https://www.facebook.com/groups/197297527292427/

    Thank you for the link to the core blog Tess

    - By Cindy
      • Cindy
        By Cindy
        Jun 9

        Tena koe Tess, the link to ero report : http://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/success-for-maori-children-in-early-childhood-services/   .  

        Also if anyone is interested in joining the kotahitanga bi-culuturalism in ECE discussion page (facebook)  I run the link is here also.  It is a safe space for Kaiako to pose questions and share ideas about bi-cultural practice .  It is a closed page so you need to request to join https://www.facebook.com/groups/197297527292427/

        Thank you for the link to the core blog Tess

        • Tessa Gray
          By Tessa Gray
          Jun 7

          Ahh kia ora Cindy thanks for sharing. smiley These are really good tips for anyone starting out or thinking of ways to lengthen their stride when creating culturally rich learning environments. Love the easy tips to be welcoming, especially the idea of kai, who doesn't lol?

          Having artefacts on display that reflects tikanga Māori and means something to tamariki, is important as you say. Is there a link to the ERO report you can share here or a list of the review questions they recommend, so we can look at those too?

          At the other end of the scale, I see Ānaru White and Jason Ruakere have also just released a CORE blog post on localised learning - outside of the classroom in the marae. Exciting! No doubt your wee ones have connections to your local marae as well smiley

          • Cindy
            By Cindy
            Jun 2

            ero also have a great report called success for māori in early childhood services that has recommendations and review questions

            • Cindy
              By Cindy
              Jun 2

              I love this Korero . on my bi-cultural Facebook page for kaiako I posed a question about how we support whānaungatanga within our settings which drew some great suggestions. I know for myself and in our educational setting building trusting relationships withat our tamariki and whānau is very important. welcoming them everyday, sharing information about their child's day, being hospitable - offering a beverage etc. food is a great ice breaker . getting to know the wider whānau and children's interests at home. another biggy for me is that our centre reflects our bi-cultural commitment- whānau and tamariki can see and feel that te ao māori is valued through pictures, posters, puzzles, books, art and displays which acknowledge tikanga Māori and what this looks like in our centre.

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