Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Tessa Gray
    A rich tiriti-led curriculum
    21 January
    Public discussion Created by Tessa Gray

    Kia ora koutou, hope you’ve had a restful and inspiring break over summer. smiley The weather has continued to delight in the sunny Bay of Plenty, I hope it's been shining in your rohe as well.

    Tenei tau (this year) sees a lot of school and kura revisit and reimagine their localised curriculum. Several in-school facilitators are also supporting schools to plan and implement a tiriti-led curriculum. Over the next few months, we'll be collecting a few stories sharing how schools are developing a rich curriculum in collaboration with mana whenua (whānau, hapū, iwi) and Mātauranga Māori (rangitira, kaumatua, experts). Strengthening these partnerships in schools, backyards and beyond is exciting. It gives our taiohi a chance to be squarely located in their own cultural narratives.

    For anyone interested in exploring themes in Marautanga-ā-Kura (see example from Helena Baker) and curriculum design check out the following resources. Also see Cultural capability for more CORE Education frameworks to help develop Te Tiriti rich curriculum design.

    The following PDF has been shared in the Kaitiakitanga curriculum Facebook group by Celia Fleck. Her colleagues at Sport Gisborne Tairāwhiti have created this resource based on the Atua Matua framework. There’s also a Te Reo version in the comments, as well as more information about Atua Matua from Dr Ihirangi Heke.


    Other resources include:

     

    Facebook groups:

    Living by The Stars with Professor Rangi Matamua

    Cultural narratives:

    Cultural narratives are entwined with science and environmental studies in Earth Education at Ngunguru School

    In this video from Ngunguru School we see cultural narratives are entwined with science and environmental studies in Earth Education at Ngunguru School. The EarthEd programme aims to embed the role as protectors of the environment (kaitiakitanga) into the everyday life of students, and is more than just educating about the environment. Through this school wide programme students develop meaningful and authentic connections with the local environment and local history, and with the earth.

    Readings for leaders:

    What localised, place-based learning opportunities do you have planned for your taiohi (young people) tenei tau?

    I love this resource from Celia and her team. It provides some really great activities for people of all ages to engage in and learn about the world around them.  

    Maria's encouragement to us all to be 'hūmārie' is a welcome and timely reminder too. It is easy to get wrapped up in ourselves and forget to listen, see, know those with whom we work, learn and play. Important too that we know and are proud of where we come from, who we are, from whom we come and be proud of it because as Maria says; "If my culture counts to me, then my act of hūmārie (humility) will show that theirs counts, too."

    I have been humbled by the learning I have done over the last few weeks as I have researched the history of Hamilton. Wally Penetito says that it is important that people have the opportunity to tell their own stories and we have a responsibility to listen to them and acknowledge them. Often there is a separation from our locality because most of us don’t know about where we are from. That may be because we have been ambivalent or not interested or it may be that we haven't had the privilege of hearing the stories from our elders or at school. We also may think we know about our place but we may only have heard one side of a story, one perspective. So as Maria says we need to be open to hearing all the stories. I have gone down numerous rabbit holes, found stories about places that contradict or overlap each other. It is fascinating unpicking the whenu and a good reminder that there is always more than one perspective and we should hold our ideas and thoughts lightly.

    So, in answer to your question - I am trying to put together a map that will show historic sites of Hamilton with some information to support them in building awareness about the place in which they live.  I have hesitated when using the name Hamilton - I usually use Kirikiriroa but I was challenged on that this morning and it has made me think. My kaiako suggested that there is a school of thought that says we should use Hamutanga for the time being until the debate about the name of this city has been resolved. Kirikiriroa is the name of one (very important) Pā which was in the heart of what is now Hamilton. To use Kirikiriroa for the whole city as it is now, risks ignoring or belittling all the other papakainga that existed along the banks of the Waikato. Interesting kōrero. I will need some time to process that and reflect on my use of the names.

    Ngā mihi

    Anne

     

     
    - By Anne-Louise Robertson
      • Anne-Louise Robertson
        By Anne-Louise Robertson
        Jan 21

        I love this resource from Celia and her team. It provides some really great activities for people of all ages to engage in and learn about the world around them.  

        Maria's encouragement to us all to be 'hūmārie' is a welcome and timely reminder too. It is easy to get wrapped up in ourselves and forget to listen, see, know those with whom we work, learn and play. Important too that we know and are proud of where we come from, who we are, from whom we come and be proud of it because as Maria says; "If my culture counts to me, then my act of hūmārie (humility) will show that theirs counts, too."

        I have been humbled by the learning I have done over the last few weeks as I have researched the history of Hamilton. Wally Penetito says that it is important that people have the opportunity to tell their own stories and we have a responsibility to listen to them and acknowledge them. Often there is a separation from our locality because most of us don’t know about where we are from. That may be because we have been ambivalent or not interested or it may be that we haven't had the privilege of hearing the stories from our elders or at school. We also may think we know about our place but we may only have heard one side of a story, one perspective. So as Maria says we need to be open to hearing all the stories. I have gone down numerous rabbit holes, found stories about places that contradict or overlap each other. It is fascinating unpicking the whenu and a good reminder that there is always more than one perspective and we should hold our ideas and thoughts lightly.

        So, in answer to your question - I am trying to put together a map that will show historic sites of Hamilton with some information to support them in building awareness about the place in which they live.  I have hesitated when using the name Hamilton - I usually use Kirikiriroa but I was challenged on that this morning and it has made me think. My kaiako suggested that there is a school of thought that says we should use Hamutanga for the time being until the debate about the name of this city has been resolved. Kirikiriroa is the name of one (very important) Pā which was in the heart of what is now Hamilton. To use Kirikiriroa for the whole city as it is now, risks ignoring or belittling all the other papakainga that existed along the banks of the Waikato. Interesting kōrero. I will need some time to process that and reflect on my use of the names.

        Ngā mihi

        Anne

         

         
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