Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    CORE Education
    Three steps towards student wellbeing
    13 March
    Public discussion Created by CORE Education

    well beingThanks to all those who came to today's Breakfast seminar and workshop in Christchurch - we hope you gained lots of thought provoking ideas about student wellbeing to take back to your learning environments from our wonderful presenter Philippa!

    This session was designed to:

    • use a framework (adapted from Lifehack for an education context) to consider where we are at in terms of nurturing student wellbeing, and to identify and explore our possible next steps.
    It also set out to:
     
    • offer rich opportunities for discussion and reflection
    • support participants to identify and explore next steps for nurturing student wellbeing.

    If you'd like to continue these conversations, please feel free to ask any questions or make a comment around the framework here below >>>

    Here are a few more thoughts I drew on when creating this Breakfast:

    Student wellbeing is inextricably linked to engagement and achievement. Increasingly both internationally and here in Aotearoa New Zealand there is a focus on improving the wellbeing of our young people. If we agree that this is important, what might a focus on student wellbeing look like in our schools?

    Firstly, we need to know what 'wellbeing' even is. The participants at the Breakfast event said this:

    WellbeingThe Education Review Office (ERO) and the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) have also done significant work in this area. 

    Last year I had the privilege of being selected for the Lifehack Flourishing Fellowship. Lifehack was a systems-level intervention in youth mental health and wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand. One of the amazing resources I was introduced to was the ‘Mapping and Mobilising Conditions for Youth Wellbeing and Hauora’. As soon as I saw it, I got excited. I could see its potential to be used in schools as a reflection tool. I tested it with a group of teachers, and we had a think about both its format and its language. Based on their feedback and thoughts, I had a play to create this version for use in schools and Kāhui Ako: Pathways towards student wellbeing.

     

    In it, I pose three key questions:

    1. Agency and Engagement: How are young people involved?
    2. Cohesion and Collaboration: How do we learn and work together to nurture wellbeing systemically?
    3. Environment and Community: Do our environments show that young people are valued and important?

    What are your thoughts? What do these question prompt you to consider?

    - By Philippa
      • Philippa
        By Philippa
        Mar 27

        Here are a few more thoughts I drew on when creating this Breakfast:

        Student wellbeing is inextricably linked to engagement and achievement. Increasingly both internationally and here in Aotearoa New Zealand there is a focus on improving the wellbeing of our young people. If we agree that this is important, what might a focus on student wellbeing look like in our schools?

        Firstly, we need to know what 'wellbeing' even is. The participants at the Breakfast event said this:

        WellbeingThe Education Review Office (ERO) and the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) have also done significant work in this area. 

        Last year I had the privilege of being selected for the Lifehack Flourishing Fellowship. Lifehack was a systems-level intervention in youth mental health and wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand. One of the amazing resources I was introduced to was the ‘Mapping and Mobilising Conditions for Youth Wellbeing and Hauora’. As soon as I saw it, I got excited. I could see its potential to be used in schools as a reflection tool. I tested it with a group of teachers, and we had a think about both its format and its language. Based on their feedback and thoughts, I had a play to create this version for use in schools and Kāhui Ako: Pathways towards student wellbeing.

         

        In it, I pose three key questions:

        1. Agency and Engagement: How are young people involved?
        2. Cohesion and Collaboration: How do we learn and work together to nurture wellbeing systemically?
        3. Environment and Community: Do our environments show that young people are valued and important?

        What are your thoughts? What do these question prompt you to consider?

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