Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    CORE Education
    Celebrating a culturally responsive environment at Broadfield School
    7 June
    Public discussion Created by CORE Education
    In these  EDtalks videos, Mike Molloy (Principal Broadfield School) talks about how they feel responsible to uphold an agreement to honour cultural understanding and values in their school. 
     
     

    Broadfield School staff, students, and the community are actively changing many aspects of their kaupapa. Principal Mike Molloy discusses how important it is to have tikanga Māori principles and values visible in their school culture.
     
     

    Mike Molloy, Principal at Broadfield School, describes how the community is committed to developing a culturally responsive environment reflecting Treaty obligations. He describes the importance of engaging the community in this process and how this is taking place.
     
    Here's a curly question. What does a culturally responsive environment look like, when there are only a few Māori students in your school? Or is this not even a factor?
     

    He ataahua tenei kura! What a beautiful school! I just love the way the school is building on the culturally responsive practice in such a meaningful way! Listening to Mike Molloy talk, you can hear his intention, his aroha in ensuring all tamariki are able to identify with their own culture within their school. I love the way they are learning about the whenua they learn and play on, and the way everyone's voices are heard.

    I particularly loved how whānau have to come in to school each day to collect their children from their classes and the intent kaiako have to ensure they are continually building meaningful partnerships.

    I worked in a kindergarten (a rural farming community) about 4 years ago, where majority of our children were of European decent. There were 2-3 Māori families in total (myself included). It took a couple of years but I finally plucked up the courage to starting challenging us as kaiako (I was a newly graduating teacher and was working alongside a really supportive team). This probably sounds small, but I started by greeting and farewelling every person that came in to our kindergarten in Te Reo māori.  For me this was a way to show that we were building our cultural competence through this simple thing. This grew in time where phrases and words were spoken to tamariki, and we started to learn about the history of our rohe, connecting to it through pepehā. What I didn't expect was how positively this was received by whānau. We were in the process of connecting with the local marae too as a way to deepen connection to our area. 

    I would have loved my children to be part of a kura that was like this! Such great mahi you and your team are doing alongside tamariki and whānau Mike! 

    Ngā Mihi nui. 

     

    - By Lisa Berryman
      • Lisa Berryman
        By Lisa Berryman
        Jun 12

        He ataahua tenei kura! What a beautiful school! I just love the way the school is building on the culturally responsive practice in such a meaningful way! Listening to Mike Molloy talk, you can hear his intention, his aroha in ensuring all tamariki are able to identify with their own culture within their school. I love the way they are learning about the whenua they learn and play on, and the way everyone's voices are heard.

        I particularly loved how whānau have to come in to school each day to collect their children from their classes and the intent kaiako have to ensure they are continually building meaningful partnerships.

        I worked in a kindergarten (a rural farming community) about 4 years ago, where majority of our children were of European decent. There were 2-3 Māori families in total (myself included). It took a couple of years but I finally plucked up the courage to starting challenging us as kaiako (I was a newly graduating teacher and was working alongside a really supportive team). This probably sounds small, but I started by greeting and farewelling every person that came in to our kindergarten in Te Reo māori.  For me this was a way to show that we were building our cultural competence through this simple thing. This grew in time where phrases and words were spoken to tamariki, and we started to learn about the history of our rohe, connecting to it through pepehā. What I didn't expect was how positively this was received by whānau. We were in the process of connecting with the local marae too as a way to deepen connection to our area. 

        I would have loved my children to be part of a kura that was like this! Such great mahi you and your team are doing alongside tamariki and whānau Mike! 

        Ngā Mihi nui. 

         

        • Victoria Knutson
          By Victoria Knutson
          Jun 11

          Great videos, thank you for sharing them with us. It is great to see how meaningful culturally responsive practice is for the children and their families. Well done 

          • Allanah King
            By Allanah King
            Jun 11

            What a great video- thanks for sharing it Mike.

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