Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    CORE Education
    What are your take-aways from uLearn18?
    15 October
    Public discussion Created by CORE Education

    Sadly, Ulearn18 is over but on a more cheerful note, this event has been hugely successful, with inspirational keynote speakers (both in person and as holograms), mind altering thought-leadership, game-changing workshops and you! Thank you to everyone who helped make this such a memorable occasion.

    Some of you have already told us what you thought about uLearn18, in addition to the fantastic gala dinner, what would be your 1 key take-away from uLearn18? Feel free to join the uLearn discussion group  to add your comments below.

    My takeaways from Ulearn18;

    This year seemed like there was such a positive spirit around from everyone despite the doom and gloom of pay and conditions negotiations. The teachers I worked with were hugely engaged and excited about what they were doing and the possibilities they were exploring. 

    As others have said, the stories were powerful both in the keynotes and in the sessions and conversations I was involved in. 

    I was deeply moved by Hana O'Regan's keynote and her challenge to us all to examine the narratives we are telling consciously and unconsciously in the worlds in which we live. How what we say and do has an impact on the people around us and how deep-seated and entrenched a narrative becomes if we don't challenge people's views. 

    It is hard sometimes as an "off comd'un" (as they say in Yorkshire - someone who is an immigrant to a community) to feel confident to challenge NZ Europeans who are 3rd and 4th generation and espouse views that are of that very narrative that damages so many of our tamariki. I know that I need to learn more about the history from the perspectives of Māori and colonists so that I can be strong in those discussions and conversations.

    I am lucky that I have so many amazing colleagues who have that expertise and wh I can work with to deepen my understanding of the language and tikanga. Time to get back to "The Great War for New Zealand" which has lain dusty under my bed for a few months (partly because it's too heavy to read in bed! and partly because I just haven't had time) so that I can use that place-based knowledge of the Waikato as I work with schools in my region.

     

    - By Anne-Louise Robertson
      • Anne-Louise Robertson
        By Anne-Louise Robertson
        Oct 19

        My takeaways from Ulearn18;

        This year seemed like there was such a positive spirit around from everyone despite the doom and gloom of pay and conditions negotiations. The teachers I worked with were hugely engaged and excited about what they were doing and the possibilities they were exploring. 

        As others have said, the stories were powerful both in the keynotes and in the sessions and conversations I was involved in. 

        I was deeply moved by Hana O'Regan's keynote and her challenge to us all to examine the narratives we are telling consciously and unconsciously in the worlds in which we live. How what we say and do has an impact on the people around us and how deep-seated and entrenched a narrative becomes if we don't challenge people's views. 

        It is hard sometimes as an "off comd'un" (as they say in Yorkshire - someone who is an immigrant to a community) to feel confident to challenge NZ Europeans who are 3rd and 4th generation and espouse views that are of that very narrative that damages so many of our tamariki. I know that I need to learn more about the history from the perspectives of Māori and colonists so that I can be strong in those discussions and conversations.

        I am lucky that I have so many amazing colleagues who have that expertise and wh I can work with to deepen my understanding of the language and tikanga. Time to get back to "The Great War for New Zealand" which has lain dusty under my bed for a few months (partly because it's too heavy to read in bed! and partly because I just haven't had time) so that I can use that place-based knowledge of the Waikato as I work with schools in my region.

         

        • Tessa Gray
          By Tessa Gray
          Oct 19

          Thank you James, Te Mako, Philippa, Tania and Kathryn for sharing your deep reflections on uLearn18. I think what inspired me too, was the energy, the good vibes and the fellowship of networking, socialising and learning with other like-minded educators. It's invigorating to see such talent in NZ and was uplifting to have your own practice affirmed and challenged at the same time.

          Events like this wouldn't be possible without passionate and innovative teachers/ leaders sharing their practice - truly 'pushing the boundaries of educational possibilities'. I look forward to engaging with more innovative educators before/during/after uLearn19 as well. smiley

          • James Hopkins
            By James Hopkins
            Oct 17

            uLearn 2018 was about the people. It came through in all the keynotes. Dr O'Regan's story and sharing around her son really had a profound impact on me as the parent of a five year old. Realising that a child of such a young age could be taking steps towards becoming a negative self fulfilling prophecy set the alarm bells ringing and they haven't stopped. It's definitely something that will stay very much in the forefront of my mind as I approach different situations this term.

            https://twitter.com/mrjhopkins/status/1049759636318875648 

            Moving into keynote two, Pasi Sahlberg's take and sharing around big vs small data was really enlightening. It was a timely reminder to look at the people and their needs, emotions and actions before we look at the global picture- or at the very least at the same time. I work with a number of principals who consistently ask about the big picture of education, keen to push their staff to the front and be at the cutting edge. But what do their people want/need/crave? Without the support of the people, who are after all the very heart of any organisation, can change ever really be effective?

            And lastly, Mike Walsh's musings around the future of education and the world. He shared some very challenging statements, for example, his belief that the current system is failing students. Perhaps his most notable statement for me came as a response to one of the questions asked by the audience:

            "Are humans learning to think less for themselves therefore teaching ourselves to becoming less intelligent?

            In many ways we don’t have the same memories because we have google! We live in times when we don’t even need to remember phone numbers. Tech has become an extension of our memory and perception. Does it makes us stupid? I think it’s changed us. It should allow us to extend ourselves. "

            I guess it all backs up what many have said... He aha te mea nui o te ao. He tāngata, he tāngata, he tāngata
            What is the most important thing in the world? It is people, it is people, it is people.

            Sometimes I think we forget this. uLearn, for me, was an incredibly powerful reminder.
            • Te Mako Orzecki
              By Te Mako Orzecki
              Oct 16

              I must admit that Hana O'Regan's keynote really set the tone for me at uLearn18. Her stories and those of her family resonated with every person in the room that at certain times you could hear a pin drop. Some very heartfelt words from Hana mixed with some very Kai Tahu humour would have to make her one of the best speakers I have heard in a long while, male or female.

              Another female that really stepped up to the play in her first appearance as MC for uLearn is Stacey Morrison. The ease with which was able to bring an energy to the role is a real mark of her professionalism. I particularly liked her acknowledgement of Papa Nick in not being present at this years conference (not physically anyway), along with the Mexican wave of course and an acknowledgement of the hard work many of the teachers in Aotearoa do on a daily basis with our tamariki and mokopuna to ensure quality education. 

              Whilst i didn't attend any workshops the kōrero and reflections coming from people who had been at these were very positive and gave teachers the sort of motivation and inspiration needed heading in to the last term of 2018. It was interesting to note all the 'first timers' to uLearn who have really loved the whole experience and i'm sure would be very keen to return next year in Rotorua.

              Lastly, ki ngā kanohi Māori i tae atu ki UAko18, ngā mea hou me ā mātou hoa tata i roto i ngā tau kua hori. Kua whakarangatira mātou o Tātai Aho Rau e rātou. Nō mātou te whiwhi ki te nohotahi ki waenganui i ēnei tangata miharo rawa. He mihi mutunga kore ki a rātou ōtira tātou katoa o Tātai Aho Rau.

               

               

              • Kathryn
                By Kathryn
                Oct 16

                Tēnā koutou e hoa mahi

                He purapura i ruia mai i Rangiātea e kore e ngaro.

                A seed sown in Rangiātea will never be lost.

                As part of the Early Years team at CORE I was excited by the synergies of our kaupapa and the keynote speakers most especially Hana. Like Philippa I am interested in our stories and cultural narratives. I think there is a great opportunity in the identity development and formation of communities of practice and Kāhui Ako to explore this further. I am excited by the collaboration I see occurring in Ōtautahi in the design of buildings that share insights into the history of the land and our people. 

                This makes me think about the whakatauki provocation cards developed by the CORE Early Years team in partnership with the ministry of education to unpack the revised curriculum Te Whāriki (2017). I think these learner centred questions get to the heart of what Philippa has shared above, ngā mihi nui.

                With the recent announcement of funding for ECE in Kāhui Ako and our own team of Early Years Accredited Facilitators I am keen to see more cross sector conversations taking place as we all work together to strengthen the pathway for our learners. I had the opportunity to facilitate several TLIF presentations in the Innovation Symposium at uLearn where this collaboration is occurring. 

                Mauri ora te whānau 

                Kathryn

                • Tania Coutts
                  By Tania Coutts
                  Oct 16

                  Tautoko Philippa - loved the stories shared.   Hana O'Regan's story of her 6 year old son is one I will share widely once the video of the keynote becomes available.  It was such a powerful story that I hope will challenge many to look deep into their thinking and the narratives of Aotearoa.  I think my key takeaway would be the connections - He tangata, he tangata, he tangata - and the way as teachers we weave our connections with sharing knowledge.  Kanohi ki te kanohi is the perfect way to start these conversations when we are spread throughout New Aotearoa.  I value the time I spent with many at ULearn this year - these connections continue to support my growth and learning.  Always standing on the shoulders of GIANTS!  

                  • Philippa
                    By Philippa
                    Oct 16

                    For me, a real theme of uLearn this year was around the power of stories. This is multi-faceted:

                    • Whose stories are told?
                    • By who?
                    • For what purpose?
                    • Whose stories are untold?

                    One of the things this really makes me think of is the idea of critical literacy, and the importance of asking big questions of the language and narratives we use to shape our thinking.

                    Mā te mōhio ko mārama, mā te mārama ka mātou.

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