Ngā Matapakinga | Discussion

    Karl Summerfield
    Humans, not users
    15 February
    Public discussion Created by Karl Summerfield

    This is an interesting post from a design mailing list I belong to. It's aimed at professional designers but makes a great point about putting the person back into your design thinking. Could be good to keep in mind as we start asking students to consider the "end-user":

    https://johannesippen.com/2019/humans-not-users/

    I read this with interest. I do believe that the human element of design is absolutely essential and the language that we use is often dehumanising. I guess I hadn't really thought about the word 'user' and how much it could make us forget that the user is a person or people. For me, the important thing is around thinking about accessibility - how can all people, with all their varying needs access and interact with the technology, the digital outcomes we create? My wee hobby horse at the moment is 'alt text' and I talk about that a lot with teachers when we discuss DDDO. The other thing is thinking about who designed and created the digital outcomes that already exist out there, who owns them, how have they shared them, for what purpose and what rights and responsibilities do we have when we choose to use them in our own designs and creations?  Our discussions have included legal, moral and ethical issues around copyright and Creative Commons. Many teachers have very little understanding in this area and I feel that we have a responsibility to encourage them to find out more and upskill... which means we have to as well!

    - By Anne-Louise Robertson
      • Anne-Louise Robertson
        By Anne-Louise Robertson
        Feb 24

        I read this with interest. I do believe that the human element of design is absolutely essential and the language that we use is often dehumanising. I guess I hadn't really thought about the word 'user' and how much it could make us forget that the user is a person or people. For me, the important thing is around thinking about accessibility - how can all people, with all their varying needs access and interact with the technology, the digital outcomes we create? My wee hobby horse at the moment is 'alt text' and I talk about that a lot with teachers when we discuss DDDO. The other thing is thinking about who designed and created the digital outcomes that already exist out there, who owns them, how have they shared them, for what purpose and what rights and responsibilities do we have when we choose to use them in our own designs and creations?  Our discussions have included legal, moral and ethical issues around copyright and Creative Commons. Many teachers have very little understanding in this area and I feel that we have a responsibility to encourage them to find out more and upskill... which means we have to as well!

        • Catherine Johnson
          By Catherine Johnson
          Feb 15

          Great post Karl and an excellent focus as we exist in this crucial time of repositioning humans as the drivers, not being driven by technological advancement. The intention of the Tech learning area maybe?

          Thoughts from others?

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